Accommodating the disabled


31-Jan-2018 08:31

When the focus is on building an inclusive environment that is welcoming to people regardless of disability, you may need to make changes to work areas, consider technological modifications, make information accessible in alternate formats or make changes to tasks or working hours. Duty to Accommodate refers to the obligation of an employer, service provider or union to take steps to eliminate disadvantage to employees, prospective employees or clients resulting from a rule, practice or physical barrier that has or may have an adverse impact on individuals or groups protected under the Canadian Human Rights Act, or identified as a designated group under the Employment Equity Act.This includes the hiring process as well as accommodating an individual once they are hired.By requiring employers to make reasonable accommodations, the ADA has had a positive effect on the placement of disabled individuals in the workforce, and has raised the consciousness of U. employers while reducing discrimination against the disabled.The language of the ADA, however, is not precise as to the "accommodations" that an employer is required to make for disabled persons during hiring and employment. EEOC provides reasonable accommodations: A reasonable accommodation is any change in the workplace or the way things are customarily done that provides an equal employment opportunity to an individual with a disability. The EEOC is committed to providing reasonable accommodations to its employees and applicants for employment to ensure that individuals with disabilities enjoy equal access to all employment opportunities.

Employers may not: In addition, an employer must make "reasonable accommodations to the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability." Congress might have stopped with this language, and allowed employers and the courts to determine what steps the "reasonable accommodation" standard requires.The duty to accommodate is most often applied in situations involving persons with physical or mental disability but it also applies to all other grounds covered by the Canadian Human Rights Act, for example: Please note: Different jurisdictions may have different interpretations about the duty to accommodate.